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Study finds arsenic in US wines

Study finds arsenic in US wines

| October 6, 2015

A newly published study by scientists at the University of Washington has found that almost all US-produced wines tested contained arsenic levels higher than those permitted in drinking water. However, a companion study concluded that estimates of the health risk from dietary arsenic should be based on the whole diet. The researchers tested 65 wine […]

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Genetic study reveals origins of E. coli O157

Genetic study reveals origins of E. coli O157

| September 24, 2015

A study led by researchers at the University of Edinburgh and Public Health England has discovered that strains of E. coli O157:H7 became dangerous human pathogens about 30 years ago when they acquired the ability to produce the stx2a shiga-toxin. The researchers studied sequenced genomes obtained from over a thousand E. coli O157 cultures isolated […]

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EU researchers highlight varying regulatory approaches to nanotech in food

EU researchers highlight varying regulatory approaches to nanotech in food

| September 15, 2015

Newly published research by the European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC) has revealed big differences in how the safe use of nanotechnology in food and feed production is regulated in different parts of the world. The research is based on information gathered by the JRC, RIKILT-Wageningen and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) from published […]

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Researchers target safer spinach

Researchers target safer spinach

| August 24, 2015

Researchers at the University of California, Riverside, have been studying the effectiveness of disinfectant washes as a means of killing foodborne pathogens on spinach leaves and other salad vegetables. Spinach and other leafy greens may become contaminated with pathogens such as Salmonella and E. coli while growing in the field, either through dirty irrigation water […]

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Researchers discover how Listeria grows on cold smoked salmon

Researchers discover how Listeria grows on cold smoked salmon

| August 7, 2015

A team of researchers in the USA have discovered that the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes uses different metabolic pathways to grow on refrigerated smoked salmon from those it uses when growing in laboratory culture media. The team, led by Dr Teresa Bergholz, assistant professor in the Department of Veterinary and Microbiological Sciences at North Dakota […]

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Study suggests some Klebsiella infections could be foodborne

Study suggests some Klebsiella infections could be foodborne

| July 28, 2015

A newly published study by US researchers at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health found antibiotic-resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae in meat that are very similar to those causing human infection. The researchers isolated Klebisella pneumoniae from 47% of 508 samples of meat (chicken, turkey and pork) taken from retail stores […]

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Simple cooking method lowers arsenic levels in rice

Simple cooking method lowers arsenic levels in rice

| July 28, 2015

Researchers at Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland, have discovered a simple technique that effectively reduces the level of potentially carcinogenic inorganic arsenic present in cooked rice. Inorganic arsenic levels in uncooked rice are much higher than in other food commodities as a consequence of how the crop is cultivated in flooded fields. Arsenic contamination has […]

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Delay fresh produce harvest after rain to reduce risk

Delay fresh produce harvest after rain to reduce risk

| July 9, 2015

Researchers at Cornell University in the USA have discovered that waiting 24 hours after rain or irrigation before harvesting can reduce the risk of foodborne illness from fresh produce. The researchers looked at the frequency of isolation of Listeria monocytogenes in spinach in fields in New York State and found that the chances of finding […]

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Optical method can identify individual bacteria

Optical method can identify individual bacteria

| June 12, 2015

A team of researchers from the Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) in Daejeon, South Korea have developed a new optical method that is said to be capable of identifying bacterial species at the single bacterium level. The new method works by directing a laser onto bacterial cells under a modified microscope to […]

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Phages in chicken could help spread antibiotic resistance

Phages in chicken could help spread antibiotic resistance

| May 19, 2015

Newly published research by investigators at the University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna, Austria revealed that many samples of chicken meat on retail sale contained phages (viruses that infect bacteria) capable of transferring antibiotic resistance genes between bacterial cells. The research team analysed 50 samples of chicken meat purchased from supermarkets and butchers in Austria […]

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