Tag: Decontamination

EFSA advises on shellfish heat treatment

EFSA advises on shellfish heat treatment

| December 17, 2015

The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has published new advice on the heat treatment of bivalve molluscs to eliminate pathogenic microorganisms, particularly viruses. The advice, compiled by experts from the Panel on Biological Hazards, is based on an evaluation of possible alternatives to the heat treatments for molluscs specified in current EU legislation. These treatments […]

Continue Reading

Latest Campylobacter in chicken survey results encouraging

Latest Campylobacter in chicken survey results encouraging

| November 26, 2015

The UK Food Standards Agency has published the first results from the second year of its survey of the prevalence of the foodborne pathogen Campylobacter on fresh whole retail chickens, revealing a small improvement in contamination rates. The published results refer to the first quarter of testing from July to September 2015, during which 1,032 […]

Continue Reading

Phage treatment could control pathogen in infant formula

Phage treatment could control pathogen in infant formula

| November 3, 2015

Researchers at Seoul National University, South Korea, have identified a bacteriophage (a virus that infects bacteria) that is active against Cronobacter sakazakii – a potentially serious bacterial pathogen sometimes associated with infant formula. The Korean research team, led by Professor Sangryeol Ryu, studied the antibacterial activity of a phage called “CR5” in infant formula inoculated […]

Continue Reading

Researchers target safer spinach

Researchers target safer spinach

| August 24, 2015

Researchers at the University of California, Riverside, have been studying the effectiveness of disinfectant washes as a means of killing foodborne pathogens on spinach leaves and other salad vegetables. Spinach and other leafy greens may become contaminated with pathogens such as Salmonella and E. coli while growing in the field, either through dirty irrigation water […]

Continue Reading

Simple cooking method lowers arsenic levels in rice

Simple cooking method lowers arsenic levels in rice

| July 28, 2015

Researchers at Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland, have discovered a simple technique that effectively reduces the level of potentially carcinogenic inorganic arsenic present in cooked rice. Inorganic arsenic levels in uncooked rice are much higher than in other food commodities as a consequence of how the crop is cultivated in flooded fields. Arsenic contamination has […]

Continue Reading

Concern over inorganic arsenic levels in rice products

Concern over inorganic arsenic levels in rice products

| June 12, 2015

The German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) is recommending that methods to minimise the levels of inorganic arsenic in rice products should be investigated in the light of recent dietary exposure studies in the German population. Analyses of rice and rice products in Germany have shown that many contain relatively high concentrations of carcinogenic […]

Continue Reading

Agency publishes final Campylobacter survey results

Agency publishes final Campylobacter survey results

| May 29, 2015

The UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) has published the final set of results from a one-year survey of Campylobacter on fresh whole chickens and packaging on sale in large supermarkets and smaller independent retailers. The results for more than 4,000 chicken skin and packaging samples tested between February 2014 and February 2015 show that about […]

Continue Reading

Oregano oil nanoemulsion could help control pathogens on fresh produce

Oregano oil nanoemulsion could help control pathogens on fresh produce

| May 5, 2015

Researchers at Wayne State University in the USA have been investigating the use of nanoemulsions of antimicrobial essential oils from plants as an alternative to chlorinated water for decontaminating fresh produce. The research team looked at essential oils from plants such thyme, oregano and clove as natural antimicrobials that could potentially reduce levels of bacterial […]

Continue Reading

Campylobacter hits the headlines

Campylobacter hits the headlines

| December 2, 2014 | 1 Comment

Campylobacter has been the commonest cause of foodborne disease in the UK for nearly ten years. Yet until quite recently, comparatively few people had ever heard of it. That is changing rapidly as the mainstream media begins to focus much more attention on this rather unusual pathogen. The latest flurry of coverage was generated last […]

Continue Reading

Study sheds light on Clostridium botulinum spore germination

Study sheds light on Clostridium botulinum spore germination

| September 19, 2014

A newly published research study by scientists at the UK Institute of Food Research (IFR) has identified part of the mechanism by which the resistant endospores of the dangerous foodborne pathogen Clostridium botulinum (the cause of botulism) are able to germinate. It is known that spore germination is initiated when certain small molecules (germinants) are […]

Continue Reading